Dean Daniel Hamilton of the William S. Boyd School of Law to Discuss Federal Appellate Courts' History at ALA Event on November 18

November 10, 2015 10:30 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

On November 18, 2015, the Association will host a luncheon at the Union League Club in Chicago featuring Dean Daniel W. Hamilton of the William S. Boyd School of Law (University of Nevada-Las Vegas). Dean Hamilton will speak about the history of the federal courts of appeal. 


Dean Hamilton is an expert on constitutional law, legal history and property law. He joined the faculty at the William S. Boyd School of Law in July 2013 from the University of Illinois College of Law where he was the Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Professor of Law and History. Prior to teaching at the University of Illinois, Dean Hamilton taught at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

Dean Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College with a degree in history. He then received his J.D. from George Washington University and later obtained a Ph.D. in American legal history from Harvard University.

Dean Hamilton is also an accomplished legal writer. His research and writing interests include American property ideology and various legal and constitutional issues from the Civil War. His work had been published in the Akron Law Review, Chicago-Kent Law Review, Journal of Supreme Court History, Journal of National Security Law, and University of Tulsa Law Review, among many others. 

The ALA welcomes all to join Dean Hamilton for an informative and engaging luncheon. For more information and to register, please click here.

Participants will earn one hour of MCLE credit.


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DISCLAIMER: The Appellate Lawyers Association does not provide legal services or legal advice. Discussions of legal principles and authority, including, but not limited to, constitutional provisions, statutes, legislative enactments, court rules, case law, and common-law doctrines are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice.

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