Former ALA President Michael Scodro and Current ALA Member Carolyn Shapiro Discuss "Most Controversial Cases" of the Current Term of the United States Supreme Court on Chicago Tonight

June 05, 2018 3:52 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
Former ALA President and Illinois Solicitor General Michael Scodro, now a partner at Mayer Brown, as well as current ALA member and former Illinois Solicitor General Carolyn Shapiro, now an associate professor of law at Chicago-Kent College of Law, appeared on Chicago Tonight recently to discuss the "Most Controversial Cases" of the current term of the United States Supreme Court.


The discussion included the recent decisions in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which held that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission’s actions of assessing a cake shop owner’s reasons for refusing to create a cake for a same-sex couple’s wedding celebration violated the free exercise clause, and Collins v. Virginia, which held that the Fourth Amendment’s automobile exception does not allow the warrantless entry of a home or its curtilage in order to search a vehicle therein. Additionally, the panel discussed other pending cases such as Janus v. AFSCME, involving union fair-share dues, and Gill v. Whitford, involving Wisconsin’s redistricting plan, as well as the Court’s denial of a petition for certiorari in Planned Parenthood of Arkansas v. Jegley, a case involving a challenge to an Arkansas law regulating medication abortions.




If the embedded video does not work, you may watch here.


Other panelists included Andy DeVooght, a partner at the firm Loeb and Loeb, and Daniel Hemel, assistant professor at the University of Chicago law school.


  • Home
  • The Brief
  • Former ALA President Michael Scodro and Current ALA Member Carolyn Shapiro Discuss "Most Controversial Cases" of the Current Term of the United States Supreme Court on Chicago Tonight

DISCLAIMER: The Appellate Lawyers Association does not provide legal services or legal advice. Discussions of legal principles and authority, including, but not limited to, constitutional provisions, statutes, legislative enactments, court rules, case law, and common-law doctrines are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software